Assertive Discipline Master Class Key Elements

ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE – THE KEY ELEMENTS OF OUR MASTER CLASS

The following are the sections contained within the Master Class file that participants receive as part of the training programme.

  1. THE CONTEXT OF ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE

How AD fits in to the teaching and learning process; AD as a training process – cognitive, affective and behavioural components.

Our traditional view of managing behaviour; why we don’t always do as we planned; increasing levels of pupil challenge; the rapidly changing nature of childhood; adult-child roles; the need to teach responsible behaviour

  1. THE 3 R’s OF BEHAVIOUR The conditions for learning – how well are these established with our classes?
  • Roles
  • Routines
  • Relationships

A ‘behaviour audit’ of the classes we teach; at the establishment phase – establishing the conditions for learning by being assertive, having a plan, and teaching responsible behaviour

  1. “TELLING ISN’T TEACHING” Tell, instruct, coach, encourage, empower. Flexible responses to behaviour – what responses might we use with different classes or different pupils?
  • Directive behaviour from teacher – high or low
  • Supportive behaviour from teacher – high or low

Employing these styles in the context of the diverse classroom; the dynamics of the classroom

  1. BEING ASSERTIVE

Managing our own feelings when faced with difficult behaviour – the difference between reactive and proactive responses

  • passive
  • hostile
  • assertive

Teacher communication styles, school cultures; script and body language; the language of choice; redirecting behaviour; practising the assertive skills

  1. HAVING A BEHAVIOUR PLAN

The components of a behaviour plan for the classroom – what are the essential elements?

  • “rules” (the guidelines for composing them)
  • “rewards” (non-verbal, verbal and material incentives)
  • “sanctions” (non-verbal, verbal and material disincentives)
  1. THE 3 STEPS FOR TEACHING RESPONSIBLE BEHAVIOUR

At the establishment phase, how do we teach and coach behaviour?

The A-B-C of Behaviour; the social influences upon behaviour.

Converting the conventional behaviour plan into a teaching method (“Rules” become the behaviour curriculum;  “Rewards” become a tool for amplifying the supportive feedback; “Sanctions” become a tool for amplifying the corrective feedback).

  1. GIVING CLEAR DIRECTIONS

Why they are needed at the establishment phase with a class

  • the components of a clear activity direction (“PRINT”)
  • establishing routines for the lesson
  1. PROVIDING SUPPORTIVE FEEDBACK

Coaching better behaviour; the idea of amplifying the supportive feedback

  • via non-verbal means
  • verbal e.g. positive repetition
  • ‘material’ e.g. classwide rewards
  1. TAKING CORRECTIVE ACTION

The idea of amplifying the corrective feedback via

  • non-verbal means
  • verbal e.g. clear reminder or warning
  • ‘material’ e.g. discipline hierarchy
  1. TACKLING TOUGH BEHAVIOUR

“Thinking brain” and “emotional brain” – differences in communication; using the refocusing technique; one-to-one meetings; whole class meetings.   

 References for this programme:

Canter, L. & Canter, M. (2001) Assertive Discipline : Positive Behaviour Management for Today’s Classroom (3rd. Edition) Canter & Associates

Canter, L. (2002) Responsible Behaviour Curriculum Guide  Canter & Associates

Moss, G. & Bayley, J (2006) The New Assertive Discipline : A Master Class  CD Resource Pack, Behaviour & Learning Management.

These and other teaching-learning resources available from Behaviour & Learning Management, 321, Eagle Tower, Montpellier Drive, Cheltenham, GL50 1TA  tel: 0870 241 8262 email info@behaviour-learning.com